The project

Systemic Risk and Systematic Value is dedicated to socially responsible macro trading strategies. Macro trading strategies are defined as alternative investment management styles predicated on macroeconomic and public policy events or trends. If the right principles and ethics are applied, social and economic benefits arise from an improved information value of market prices, increased efficiency of global capital allocation and reduced risk of financial markets crises.

SPECIAL: Liqudity

Volcker Rule and liquidity risk

The Volcker Rule has banned proprietary trading of banks with access to official backstops. Also, market making has become more onerous as restrictions and...

The illiquidity risk premium

The illiquidity risk premium is an excess return paid to investors for tying up capital. The premium compensates the investor for forfeiting the options...

Why the covered interest parity is breaking down

Deviations in the covered interest parity have become a regular phenomenon even in developed markets. Persistent gaps between on-shore and FX-implied interest rate differentials (“cross-currency...

SYSTEMIC RISK

Low rates troubles for insurances and pension funds

A CGFS report highlights the pressure of a ‘low for long’ interest rate environment on...

Update on the great public debt issue

The latest IMF fiscal monitor is a stark reminder of the public finance risks in...

How to prepare for the next systemic crisis

Systemic crises are rare. But they are make-or-break events for long-term performance and social relevance...

Modern financial system leverage

Leverage in modern financial systems arises from bank balance sheets and off-balance sheet transactions that...

The shadow of China’s banks

Unlike in the U.S., shadow banking in China is dominated by commercial banks, not securities...

SYSTEMATIC VALUE

Endogenous market risk

Understanding endogenous market risk (“setback risk”) is critical for timing and risk management of strategic...

What variance swaps tell us about risk premia

Variance swaps are over-the-counter derivatives that exchange payments related to future realized price variance against...

The dangerous disregard for fat tails in quantitative finance

The statistical term ‘fat tails’ refers to probability distributions with relatively high probability of extreme...

The importance of volatility of volatility

Options-implied volatility of U.S. equity prices is measured by the volatility index, VIX. Options-implied volatility...

Seasonal effects in commodity futures curves

Seasonal fluctuations are evident for many commodity prices. However, their exact size can be quite...

POPULAR POSTS

The four components of long-term bond yields

A BOJ paper proposes an affine terms structure model for bond yields under consideration of the zero lower bound. It estimates the contribution of...

Leverage in asset management

Asset managers can use leverage to enhance returns. Outside hedge funds, such leverage is modest as share of assets under management. However, considering the huge...

Why the covered interest parity is breaking down

Deviations in the covered interest parity have become a regular phenomenon even in developed markets. Persistent gaps between on-shore and FX-implied interest rate differentials (“cross-currency...

Understanding market beta in FX

The beta of an investment measures its sensitivity to “market returns”. Unlike in equity, in FX the relevant benchmark for a beta cannot be a...

Trend following as tail risk hedge

Typical returns of a trend following strategy carry features of a “long vol” position and have positive convexity. Typical returns of long only strategies,...

Lessons from long-term global equity performance

A truly global and long-term (116 years) data set for both successful and failed financial markets shows that equity has delivered positive long-term performance...